African States Sign Cyber Security Deal – Legal Consultancy From CWIIL Group of Companies

Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan are among several African states to have signed a new deal on cyber security to protect multi-million-dollar oil and transport projects.

Presidents Yoweri Museveni of Uganda, Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya signed a memorandum of understanding on cyber security at the 10th Northern Corridor Integration Summit in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, on Saturday.

South Sudanese leader Salva Kiir and Pierre Nkurunziza of Burundi were represented by ministers.

The Northern Corridor summit has seen Uganda, Kenya, South Sudan and Rwanda review visa and ID card arrangements plus focus on the construction of a standard gauge railway and an oil pipeline.

Uganda made commercial oil discoveries in 2006 in the Albertine Region in the country’s south west with projected production to start in 2017 or 2018. Kenya has an estimated 10-billion-barrel reserve; South Sudan has just under half this.

The countries’ railway project is expected to ease the transportation of oil from Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan – which are also eyeing oil pipelines.

Uganda has signed an agreement worth $3.32 billion for engineering, procurement and construction contract with China Harbor and Engineering Company for the Northern and Eastern route of the standard gauge railway. Kenya has already progressed with the construction of the Mombasa-Nairobi section of the railway.

Ambassador James Mugume from Uganda said: “This cyber security agreement is going to be very important for this region. “If you invest money into a railway and oil pipeline and you don’t invest in security to protect it then you are wasting money, because terrorists will come and sabotage it. This is why within the Northern Corridor there is a supportive defensive system.”

The heads of states also signed agreements on total liberalization of labor and services and a memorandum of understanding on foreign policy coordination.

“As we integrate and look at various issues and projects, terrorists groups and other criminal elements are also taking advantage of the now-strong use of the internet platforms for communication and moving money,” Mugume added.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

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Cyber Security – Missing Link In Africa’s Online Connectivity Boom – IT Security Advice & Solutions From CWIIL Group

Although the enabling potential of the internet for Africa is a popular story told alongside impressive statistics on internet access growth, cyber security needs more attention to keep pace with the rate of digital penetration.

High profile cases of cyber crime such as the recent hack on Sony Pictures are increasing public awareness of the risks associated with digitisation and the internet.

In Africa, internet usage grew seven times faster than the global average between 2000 and 2012, clocking more than 3,600 percent growth to a total 167 million users. Yet the flipside of the rapid expansion of internet infrastructure is poor cyber security safeguards.

On 17 January 2012 an Indonesian student and amateur hacker known online as Direxer hacked and defaced 103 Kenyan government websites. His tools? Tutorials on the Indonesian language forum Code Security. He attacked everything from the ministries of finance and education to police and prisons, leaving a song to play in the background when each site opened. Reportedly no information was stolen – but likely only because on this occasion theft was not the objective.

In a 2012 report, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) advises developing countries to “integrate protection measures into the roll-out of the internet from the beginning” because integrating these measures later on would be more cost-intensive.

“Although this might initially raise the cost of internet services, the long-term gains in avoiding the costs and damage inflicted by cybercrime are large and far outweigh any initial outlays on technical protection measures and network safeguards,” the report’s authors argue.

As a late adopter of internet infrastructure, African countries can capitalise on hindsight without having yet invested too many resources in developing it. Secure internet connections can be a competitive advantage in a future dominated by the online world, just as insecure internet can be a disadvantage.

Cyber criminals often look for a ‘mass market’ to hack, requiring many online targets and a preference for more affluent ones such as banks or large corporations. While some markets in Africa do not yet meet these criteria, this is no defence for the likes of South Africa, the third most attacked country after Russia and China.

At CyberCon 2014, David Isiavwe, chairperson of the Information Security Society of Nigeria, explained the ease of hacks in Africa makes the return on investment worthwhile.

“Most attacks launched towards Africa are actually coming from the US, because we are struggling here to keep things secure. The attackers target the markets that have the lowest work factor involved, and Africa is easier to breach,” he explains.

‘Computing hygiene’ is a set of practices that can help reduce the risk of digital attacks, according to David Finn, executive director, Microsoft Cybercrime Centre. These include using the official, most recent versions of software, anti-virus programmes and avoiding questionable sites. “We know unlicensed versions of software have a higher risk of being infected,” says Mr Finn.

However adoption of these measures remain low in many African countries. According to a Business Software Alliance report, on average 59 percent of software in Africa is unlicensed. Higher rates are found in Egypt (62 percent), Tunisia (75 percent), Kenya (78 percent), and Nigeria (81 percent).

One quarter of African computer users are still using Windows XP, first released in 2001. It is Africa’s second most popular operating system after the more recent Windows 7 at 52.85 percent, released in 2011.

“That is more than 10 year old technology at this point. That puts African computer users more at risk,” says Mr Finn. “The older versions of software do not benefit from the technological innovations and the security advances that the technology companies are able to leverage.”

The onus does not lie solely with consumers, however. Very little can be accomplished on a system-wide basis without the collaboration of a wide variety of organisations at the national, regional and global levels. CEOs, mindful of their share prices and quarterly targets, have reason to not want to disclose they have been attacked. However, this hinders coordinated counter-measures.

More fundamentally, cybercrime is not actually considered a crime in every country. Where the legal framework is in place, the definition of cybercrime often differs from one country to another.

“Africa as a whole is a good breeding ground for cyber criminals,” says Jason Gottschalk, associate director of KPMG South Africa. “Lack of legislation, lack of counter-attack capabilities, lack of the forensic skills, the ability to understand how these attacks are taking hold, makes it a good place for criminals to operate.”

Attempts have been made to address this, but efforts to draft an African Union convention on legal frameworks for cyber security has stalled since 2012.

The ITU’s Secretary-General, Dr Hamadoun Toure, recognises the challenges yet remains optimistic. He has found that the ITU’s Global Cybersecurity Index is useful for motivating government partners to take action. The index ranks countries across their legal and regulatory frameworks, technical readiness, national coordination, capacity building and international cooperation on cyber security. According to the ranking, Mauritius, Cameroon and Rwanda lead the continent in this regard.

“The countries in Africa that have succeeded, like Mauritius, have put in the right regulatory framework. Since 2001 they have been working on those things,” says Dr Toure.

The economic and social opportunity to optimise cyber security for Africa’s future has not passed yet, but it will take rapid action and concerted effort. However, this message is easily lost among the many urgent issues that compete for attention and resources.

“The first point is you have to realise that there is a problem…and I’m not quite sure the African continent is there yet,” says Mr Gottschalk.

As African countries try to navigate challenging social, economic and political transformations, cyber security does not yet appear to be a priority. However, as connectivity spreads, so will awareness of the security issues that accompany the many opportunities access affords – hopefully spurring the necessary attention and reforms needed to keep Africa’s internet users safe.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of cyber security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to cyber security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

Security Concerns Before Investing In Africa? – Specialized Advice From CWIIL Group

Africa’s dynamic security environment is characterized by great diversity – from conventional challenges such as insurgencies, resource and identity conflicts, and post-conflict stabilization to growing threats from piracy, narcotics trafficking, violent extremism, and organized crime taking root in Africa’s urban slums, among others.

Africa’s political environment has traditionally been a volatile one, characterised by instability, conflict, weak democratic institutions and military coups.  Socio–economic disparities and political tensions, overlaid with an abundance of natural resources, have ensured that the many of the continent’s states struggle with issues of conflict and instability. These conflicts are often hinged on several factors including poverty, human rights violations, bad governance and corruption, ethnic marginalization and small arms proliferation.

The continent has now come sharply into the spotlight for investors amidst growing questions around rising political and security risks. Amongst the key themes investors are grappling with are the mounting threats of religious extremism, the prospects of destabilising election-related violence, the growing issue of piracy as well as the potential spill-over of ethnic, religious tensions into widespread unrest. Consequently, the impact of these fundamental factors on the economic stability of countries has become critically important.

In an effort to help readers stay on top of this extensive array of security issues, ACSS  [ Africa Center for Strategic Studies ] has compiled and regularly updates a selective list of “must read” analyses of priority Africa security topics. The views expressed are those of the authors and do not represent an endorsement by ACSS or the the US Department of Defense.

Please click on a link below to learn more:

If you are in doubt whether to invest in an African region / country due to security worries always seek out information of the political, social, military, and economic aspects of security in that particular region / country from various sources to be able to make a fully knowledgeable and informative decision before proceeding with your investment regardless of it being as a private investor, corporate, institutional or even national level.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advise and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Google+ I Tumblr I Pinterest

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

Kinds of PPP and Contract Models in International Practice – Specialized Advice From CWIIL Group PPP Units

We distinguish PPPs with regards to kinds of partnerships. The public private relationship in PPPs can either be “horizontal” or “vertical” in nature. In a horizontal partnership both partners are directly engaged as shareholders in a special purpose vehicle (SPV), which is providing required infrastructure services. In a vertical partnership the public sector contracts with the private partner through a concession agreement or a PPP-contract, and the latter is responsible for providing required services.

PPPs can further be divided according to the existing mode of sector financing into user-financed and budget-financed models. Under the former model, the private partner has its investment recovered through user charges that are directly linked to the infrastructure or services, such as tolls, vignette, licensing fee, water tariffs and ticketing. While under the latter model the private partner delivers service in return of down payments made by the public partner that are commensurate with the service level provided or upon availability of the facility. A key government responsibility here is to decide which mode of financing to apply and the choice is subject to the nature of infrastructure
service as well as political and economic circumstances of that country. The structure of financing will also affect the level of efficiency gains achieved.

Under functional and material privatisations, there are various PPP contract models employed in the international practice for different sectors. These varying models of PPPs have become commonly known by the acronyms of the tasks delegated. The following gives more details regarding what
these models might entail:

Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT) arrangement involves the transfer of responsibility for constructing, financing and operating a single facility to a private sector partner for a fixed period of time. At the end of that period, the responsibility reverts to the public party. The bundling of building and operations allows for “lifecycle efficiency”. The additional financing cost incurred by using the private sector can be offset by a reduction in operating costs resulting from the lifecycle approach in design, construction and operation. BOT is perhaps the most familiar models of PPP and the basic concept has been employed with some variations in many different ways, including BOOT, DBLOT and DBROT. Some
models are more prevalent in some nations than others.

Design-Build-Finance-Operate (DBFO) means that the private sector partner is also asked to supply resources for having the project built. Future revenue streams are usually based on availability payments made by the public sector or shadow tolls. Hence this contract model belongs to typical budget-financed PPPs.

Build-Operate-Own (BOO) involves the granting of ownership rights in perpetuity to develop, finance, design, build, own, operate, and maintain an asset. The private sector owns the asset outright and retains the ownership and operating revenue risk, with no transfer to the public sector. It is hence categorised as material PPP.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to Public-Private Partnerships, (PPP), ensures advise based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable business advise can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email : africa@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For any / all other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

 

 

 

What Are the Advantages of Forming Public Private Partnerships? Specialized Consultancy & Advice From CWIIL Group PPP Units

Generally, the advantages of PPP are considered as follows:

  • to remove the responsibility of funding the investment from the government’s balance sheet;
  • to introduce competition;
  • to adopt managerial practices and experience of the private sector;
  • to restructure public sector service by embracing private sector capital and practices; and
  • to achieve greater efficiency than traditional methods of providing public services.

The last one, efficiency gain, is the main source of sustainable public savings and, therefore the main objective of and justification for PPP. In the UK, the Treasury estimates that the use of PPPs has produced average savings of 17% to 25% over all sectors during the past 10 years.

Most governments are drawing their decisions for PPP based on greater efficiency the private promoter delivers in comparison to the traditional public procurement. Major drivers for efficiency gains are transfer of risk to the private sector, long-term nature of contracts, incentive structures and payment upon performance, output-oriented service specification, competition between bidders, incorporate feedback and negotiation in the procurement process, innovation and management skills by the private sector, and administrative cost reduction.

For example, in Germany, the basis for the decision whether to adopt a PPP approach or to procure the project conventionally through government resources lies in the evaluation of the Public Sector Comparator (PSC). Each PPP project is, before being tendered, compared to traditional public sector procurement by a so called “value for money test” (or efficiency comparison test), which comprises quantitatively a comparison of the net present value of all cost incurred during the intended contract period, i.e. for design, construction, finance, maintenance, operation etc. for the traditional (PSC) and the PPP option.

Also in many other industrialised countries, efficiency gains have to be proven before the contract award and the governmental agency estimates the cost of traditional public procurement by setting up a PSC. Structuring a PSC, however, bears numerous sources for false estimations. Common critics are the lack of reliable historical data for lifecycle cost estimation, over-optimistic assumptions for public delivery in time and on budget, selection of appropriate discount rates and mechanism applied for risk stress testing.

PSC therefore may not be the only approach in assessing efficiency gains. The key decision criterion for PPP should be determined by a suitable framework to assess and control efficiency gain with respect to a country’s economic and legal conditions. In many Asian countries, no PSC is being set up for determining efficiency gains. Efficiency is achieved by assuming, politically, that the private sector is by nature more efficient than the public sector in delivery services. PPP tendering is done without any PSC test and past experiences have shown that greater efficiency has been achieved through competition among bidders and introduction of the market feedback period.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to Public-Private Partnerships, (PPP), ensures advise based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable business advise can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email : africa@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For any / all other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

 

How To Get Reliable Market Information For Local and International Markets? Special Information Packages from CWIIL Group of Companies

Getting reliable market information relevant to your business vertical / industry / sector can be a both tiresome and expensive task; especially if you are looking for information in regards to establishing your business in a foreign market you often have to depend on external sources, i.e. professional consultancies, government agencies, embassies etc., whom, more often that not, are charging hefty rates. To accommodate the those who are unwilling or unable to pay such lofty rates, our professionals have created special Information Packages keeping in mind the professional and financial needs and requirements of small and medium enterprises, worldwide.

The Information Packages contains various levels of intelligence depending on what your current desire and requirements are, and most importantly, are compiled in a collective manner based on multiple sources delivered in one combined report for you as per the vertical/s and country / region you wish to receive information on.

The packages have basic levels of information on the vertical/s, the market/s and vendors within a given territory. More comprehensive information including government policies and online support from our teams are available in the higher leveled packages. Details of the content of each package are given here below :

Basics Packages :

1. General information & market overview on 1 vertical in 1 country / state, list of names of 10 biggest vendors in the chosen vertical.

2. General information and market overview of 2 verticals in 2 countries / states, list of 10 biggest venders per vertical with general contact details. Online support for 2 Q&A’s per month.

Intermediate Packages :

3. Intermediate level market analysis and information on 2 verticals in 2 countries, list of 10 biggest vendors per vertical per country / state with general contact details. General information on government policies per country / state. Online support for up to 5 Q&A’s per month.

4. Intermediate level information and market overview of 5 verticals in 5 countries, list of 20 biggest vendors per vertical, per country with general contact details and a contact name. General information on government policies per vertical, per country. Online support for up to 10 Q&A’s per month.

Full Packages :

5. Detailed market analysis and information on up to 5 verticals within 1 region, i.e. USA / EU/ Russia / China / Australia / MENA etc., list of up to 50 biggest vendors per vertical with details of direct contact name and full contact details. Full details of government policies per vertical per country. Full online support with up to 15 Q&A’s per month.

6. Detailed market analysis and information on up to 10 verticals within 1 region, i.e. USA / EU / Russia / China / Australia / MENA etc., list of up to 100 biggest vendors per vertical with details of direct contact name and full contact details. Full details of government policies per vertical, per country. Full online support with up to 20 Q&A’s per month.

Additional Premium Services :

1. Unlimited Q&A’s with 24/7 online support

2. Unlimited Q&A’s answered one-to-one in person at client’s residence by one of our Group official and also personal representation of / for the client on ground, worldwide.*

*N.B. : All travel, lodging and boarding are to be paid on actuals, for min. 1 CWIIL Group official for up to 4 working hours per day, 5 days per week, excluding public holidays, weekends, local / regional / national / international holidays.

Prices for the Information Packages starts @ €149 per month, which can be paid 1, 3, 6 or 12 months in advance – a Special Summer Discount of 25% until August 15th, 2013, on all orders of min. 12 months paid in advance.

Information Packages are available worldwide for any / all the verticals that CWIIL Group is present in which include, but is not limited to, infrastructure, EPC, power, legal, media, astro, aviation, technology, IT / ITES, pest control, real estate, hospitals, medicine & health, events & entertainment, education, manpower, shipping, oil & gas, chemicals, gems & jewelry, bullion trade & financing, funding & investment, mergers & acquisitions, business & legal consultancy & solutions, takeover & revival of sick units, and public private partnerships, to name a few. If your specific vertical / industry / sector is not mentioned above, please do not hesitate to inquire and we would do our best to accommodate you subject to our Group policies, terms and conditions.

Feel free to contact our teams with any queries or for further information – you are welcome to seek our advice or counsel on various matters, which for the record are always provided free of charge, as all our businesses are 100% transparent and based on the four corners of prevailing laws.

Consulting the teams of professionals in any unit of CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all your business intelligence matters, ensures advise based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessing of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and unknowledgeable legal advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This form of group advise and approach is unique with all CWIIL Group Services, Solutions, Products and Projects, and is in tune with the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email : africa@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For any / all other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

How To Form & Establish Company In Ghana

Establishment of Enterprises

Application for registration of a company in Ghana made directly, or through agents or solicitors, to the Registrar-General. A company is duly registered after the company’s regulations have been submitted to the registrar of companies and a certificate of incorporation issued. A specified fee is paid on presentation of the regulations. The information required includes:

  • the name of the company with the word “Limited” as the last word in the name
  • the nature of the company’s business
  • the names of the first directors of the company
  • a statement that the liability of the company is limited
  • the share capital and its division into shares of no par value
  • a statement that the company possesses all the powers of a natural person of full capacity
  • limitation on the powers of the Board of Directors in accordance with section 202 of the Companies Code
  • any other lawful provisions relating to the constitution and administration of the company.

The requirements for a public company limited by shares are similar to those stated above, except that the public can buy shares.

Commencement of Business

Before commencing business, further information on the company must be provided. This includes the particulars of the company and a declaration of compliance.

The particulars of the company are given on Form No. 3 and signed by the directors and the company secretary. The information provided must include:

  • name of company
  • authorised business
  • particulars of directors (at least two) and a secretary
  • name and address of auditors
  • addresses of the company’s registered office and principal place of business
  • address at which register of members is maintained
  • amount of stated capital; number of authorized and issued shares, amount paid (other than cash), and amount due for each class.

The declaration of compliance is made on Form No. 4. This states that the conditions of section 28 of the Companies Code pertaining to a minimum capital issue of 25,000 cedis (C) has been paid and signed by all directors and the secretary of the company. There is a stamp duty of 0.5 per cent of capital issue payable. Upon due completion and presentation of the forms, the registrar issues the company with a certificate of commencement of business.

Annual Returns

Limited Liability Companies must file annual returns with the Registrar of Companies showing its audited balance sheet and profit-and-loss statement after 18 months of incorporation.

External Company

An external company is a body corporate formed outside Ghana but which has an established place of business in Ghana. This can take the form of a branch, management, share, transfer, registration office, factory, mine or other fixed place of business, but does not include an agency unless the agent is authorized to negotiate and conclude contracts on behalf of the outside company.

Within one month of the establishment of the place of business, the external company should deliver to the registrar of companies the following:

An English language translation of a certified copy of the charter, statutes, regulations, memorandum and articles or other instrument constituting or defining the constitution of the company, and statement of the following in duplicate:

  • name
  • nature of business or main objects
  • name, address and business occupation of the local
  • manager authorized to manage the business in Ghana
  • number of authorized shares, amount paid and what
  • is remaining payable in cash or otherwise
  • address of its registered or principal office in the country of its incorporation
  • address including post office box number of its principal place of business in Ghana
  • name and address in Ghana of a person authorised by the company to accept service of process and other documents on its behalf
  • particulars and copies of any charges on the property of the company or if no such charges, then statement to that effect.

On receipt of the documents, they are registered in the Registrar of External Companies and the particulars gazetted.

An external company may invite the Ghanaian public to subscribe to its shares, subject to its complying with requirements of the Companies Code concerning invitations and the prospectus as if it were a Ghanaian company. The registrar, however, has the discretion to waive or modify parts of these requirements.

Annually, or at intervals not exceeding 15 months, the external company must submit for registration, a profit-and-loss account and balance sheet (as in the limited liability return of accounts).

Alterations made in the charter, statutes, regulations, articles or other instruments used in registration should be delivered to the registrar within two months of the effective date of the alteration.

The various forms required for registration of companies are obtainable from the Registrar-General. Prospective investors should obtain competent professional advice on the type of company which may best meet their needs. Such advice is obtainable from:

The Registrar-General
Registrar-General’s Department
P.O. Box 118
Accra, Ghana
Tel: (233-302) 662043/664691.

These materials are not intended and should not be used as legal advice or other recommendation. If you need a legal opinion on a specific issue or factual situation, please contact a lawyer. Anyone using these materials should not rely on them as a substitute for legal advice.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to your business startup, ensures advise based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessing of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and unknowledgeable business advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advise and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email : africa@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For any / all other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

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Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.