China Announces Ban on Ivory Trade by End of 2017

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China will ban all domestic ivory trade and processing by the end of 2017, a move described by activists as a potential “game changer” for African elephants.

African ivory is highly sought after in China, where it is seen as a status symbol, and prices can reach as high as $1,100 a kg.

“China will gradually stop the processing and sales of ivories for commercial purposes by the end of 2017,” the official Xinhua news agency said on Friday, citing a government statement.

The announcement follows China’s move in March this year [2016 red.] to widen a ban on imports of all ivory and ivory products acquired before 1975 after pressure to restrict a trade that sees thousands of elephants slaughtered every year.

Xinhua said the complete ban would affect “34 processing enterprises and 143 designated trading venues, with dozens to be closed by the end of March 2017”.

“This is great news that will shut down the world’s largest market for elephant ivory,” Aili Kang, executive director of the Wildlife Conservation Society in Asia, said in a statement.

“I am very proud of my country for showing this leadership that will help ensure that elephants have a fighting chance to beat extinction. This is a game changer for Africa’s elephants.”

Conservationists estimate that more than 20,000 elephants were killed for their ivory last year, with similar tolls in previous years.

The WWF campaign group says 415,000 of the animals remain.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which took effect in 1975, banned ivory trade in 1989.

Like other countries, China permits the resale of ivory bought before the ban, and also has a stockpile purchased with CITES approval in 2008, which it releases for sale with certification.

WWF also praised China’s move to a complete ban but called on the Chinese territory of Hong Kong to bring forward a plan to end its ivory trade by 2021.

“With China’s market closed, Hong Kong can become a preferred market for traffickers to launder illegal ivory under cover of the legal ivory trade,” said Cheryl Lo, senior wildlife crime officer at WWF.

Originally reported by Al Jazeera.

Note: An Al Jazeera undercover team penetrated the network of dealers, agents and traffickers who profit from the multi-million dollar trade in Rhino horn. An illegal business that is decimating the Rhino population close to the point of extinction – a video on the investigation published on November 12, 2016 can be viewed here.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email : africa@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

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Solar Power Brightens Prospects in East Africa

Posted with permission from Newsweek.

Jacinta Auma shuffles slowly into her dim, mud-walled house, sits down, kicks off her sandals and switches on a light and a small television – a little miracle in this rural, deeply traditional corner of western Kenya. An estimated two-thirds of sub-Saharan Africa’s population lack electricity, according to the International Energy Agency. To cope, many have long used kerosene-powered generators, but they are not only unhealthy and environmentally destructive, but also unsustainable.

Auma’s house is powered by an alternative source of energy: Every day, she lines up a solar panel outside her home, where it soaks up sunlight. The energy the panel gathers charges the batteries that power all her electrical devices.

Until recently, solar power has been elusive for most here because of its high costs and unpredictability. But recent advancements have led to solar cells that are less expensive, sturdier and able to produce more wattage from the sunlight they absorb. In addition, because Kenya is equatorial, it’s bombarded with sun year-round. Already, 14 percent of Kenyan households use solar as their primary lighting and charging source, according to a 2015 study by the global research consultancy InterMedia.

Auma pays for her system through a lease-to-own program run by M-Kopa Solar, a Canadian company. Customers make a small down payment and then make daily payments of pennies a day, sent via the M-Pesa mobile payment system. Auma says it costs her less than kerosene used to. According to M-Kopa, each home in its program will save $750 over a four-year period compared with using kerosene. That’s significant in a part of the world where $15 feeds a family for a month. After two years of paying the daily fee, Auma will take full ownership of her 8-watt solar home system, which includes three lights, a phone-charging facility and a rechargeable radio.

Solar power is rapidly spreading throughout East Africa. M-Kopa has connected 50,000 homes in Uganda and 40,000 in Tanzania. Mobisol, a German-based company that offers a similar lease-to-own service, says it has delivered electricity to more than 45,000 households and businesses in East Africa, mostly in Rwanda and Tanzania, and is planning to expand to Kenya. Orb Energy, an Indian solar energy firm, has partnered with Kenya’s local Equity Bank to advance low-interest loans for those who want to buy equipment – solar panels, and solar-powered water heaters, lamps and TVs.

In rural Kenya, reliable electricity can be life-changing. Janet Nakhonwe had never been in a town connected to an electrical grid, never even slept in a room that had electric lights. For the first time, she has electricity throughout her home in Lumino, a village on the Ugandan border. The biggest impact, she says, has been on her six kids’ schooling. “My children can now study well and complete their assignments on time,” she says, because every single night they have light to read by. “Last term, they performed excellent in their exams.”

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Mohammad Mukhtar Mustafa,
Deputy Global Director, No. 4,
Strategic Business & Intelligence Division,
Email : deputy.gd.4@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1923
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email : africa@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

New Bond Issue Set To Help Africa Go Green – Investment Consultancy From CWIIL Group of Companies

Johannesburg, or Jozi, as it is affectionately known, is the largest commercial hub on the continent, attracting millions of visitors each year, including students, artists and business leaders. Its population of about 4.8 million people is projected to grow to 6.5 million by 2040, according to the World Population Review.

Faced with this record growth and its foreseeable impact on the city’s aging infrastructure and social services, Johannesburg’s Executive Mayor Parks Tau gave a nod to a greener path for development in his 6 May 2015 State of the City address. Among the promised innovations he listed were low-flush toilets and water-saving urinals to become a standard feature in Johannesburg homes, offices and commercial sites, alleviating the pressure on the city’s scarce water reserves.

Organic waste is to be harvested for fuel and energy, and solar heaters and smart metres installed to reduce the consumption of electricity. Furthermore, to lower pollution, he hopes to reduce the commuters’ reliance on private vehicles in favour of walking and biking. The mayor also promised to improve the public transport system and switch to diesel fuel to lower the city’s carbon footprint.

To finance these initiatives, the city auctioned its first ever “green bond” on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) last June. The bond, which is worth $143 million and is expected to mature in 2024, was 150% oversubscribed – a success! In a speech delivered shortly after the listing of the bond, Mayor Tau said it was a clear demonstration of “investor confidence in the City of Johannesburg and commitment to environmental stewardship and climate change.”

A bond is a type of loan or an IOU which companies, governments or banks use to finance projects. The issuer is obliged to pay back the debt within a time agreed and with a certain interest. What warrants the “green” label is that the proceeds are allocated to climate and environment-friendly projects. By issuing this type of bond, Johannesburg became not only a pioneer in Africa, but also within the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, a network of megacities sharing best practices and feasible solutions to changing weather patterns.

Green Bond Allure

Green bonds are not different from conventional bonds in their pricing. Much of their allure lies in the fact that investors feel they are being “socially responsible” and that they are having a positive impact on the environment. According to the World Bank’s senior sustainability advisor, Laura Tlaiye, investors are increasingly recognizing the threats environmental degradation and climate change can create for long-term financial value, and are considering it when they choose their investments.

At the same time, investors are also drawn to these fixed-income green loans that promise regular returns and a full refund of the principal amount once the bond has matured. And in the case of the World Bank, one of the largest financiers for climate-smart projects in developing countries, their bonds bring triple “A” ratings, indicating they are extremely safe and low-risk. But as the market expands, so does the need for more clarity on how the capital raised is used. International institutions providing development financing, like the European Investment Bank (EIB), were the first to enter the green bond market in 2007. A year later, the World Bank joined forces with the Swedish financial group, Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken AB (SEB), to respond to a demand by Scandinavian pension funds looking to invest in environmentally friendly fixed-income products. Since then, the World Bank has continued to raise a lot of capital for projects that seek to mitigate climate change in developing countries or seek to help affected people adapt to it.

So far, Tunisia has received a loan of over $30 million to promote better water management by using the country’s irrigation and drinking water more efficiently, while Morocco has successfully applied for funds to build North Africa’s biggest solar power plant in an effort to curb its reliance on coal and other fossil fuels. To date, the bank has issued the equivalent of $8 billion in green bonds through more than 90 transactions in 18 currencies.

Socially Responsible Investors

Climate change is presently one of the greatest challenges confronting the developed and the developing world, warns the African Development Bank (AfDB), which set up a green bond programme in 2013. Without a concerted effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, echoes the International Finance Corporation, an affiliate of the World Bank, the earth’s temperatures could rise considerably within this century. In order to keep global temperatures below 2 degrees Celsius as agreed by negotiators during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) negotiations.

Business editor and author Mark Gunther, in the Yale Environment 360 online magazine, questions whether green bonds could “bankroll a clean energy revolution” and is uncertain where the money would come from. In a sense, he argues, green bonds are the latest example of “themed bonds for a specific purpose ” pointing to the 1862 civil war bonds that helped finance the US army and World War II bonds sold by celebrities at the time.

With the market raking in billions of dollars a year, it seems the appetite for these new debts is growing as well as the emergence of new types of issuers as evidenced by the case of Johannesburg. In March 2014, corporations like Toyota joined the fray to fund consumer loans for electric and hybrid cars. During the same period, the global consumer goods company Unilever and the French utility company GDF Suez of France issued green bonds to finance their renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

Although there is no market standard for the definition of green, Marilyn Ceci, managing director and head of Green Bonds at JP Morgan wrote in the global knowledge sharing platform called Meeting of the Minds, in February 2015, that there are the Green Bonds Principles (GBP), which serve as voluntary guidelines on transparency and disclosure and are endorsed by environmental groups, investors and other issuers.

Transparency

The four components of the GBP include a description of how the proceeds of the bonds are to be used, an outline of the decision-making process disclosing the criteria used to review and determine the eligibility of the project, as well as tracking the proceeds and reporting on how they are being used at least once a month.

The World Bank initially set the bar high with its rigorous six-stage selection, approval, review and reporting process. The eligibility criteria are verified by experts from the Norway-based Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research (CICERO). Interested investors can check the institution’s website to get detailed updates on the projects, complete with pictures, graphics and summaries.

The World Bank applies a “gold standard” in the selection of its eligible projects. For example, the bank’s green bond portfolio will not include nuclear projects or those that deal with natural gas extraction by fracking. The bulk of the bank’s green bond projects are in middle-income countries like Mexico, China and Africa’s Maghreb region like Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco whose low-carbon projects funded by the World Bank are in full swing.

Projects in sub-Saharan Africa receive support through the International Development Association (IDA), the bank’s fund for the poorest, which doles out “low-interest loans, credits or grants from donors rather than from capital markets”.

However, while African countries south of the Sahara have made a grand debut into the international debt market scene, their presence in the green bond market is nascent. For now it seems, Johannesburg is leading having listed the first “African green city bond” in the region.

These materials are not intended and should not be used as legal / investment advice or other recommendation. If you need a legal / investment opinion on a specific issue or factual situation, please contact a lawyer / investment advisor. Anyone using these materials should not rely on them as a substitute for legal / investment advice.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

5 Reasons To Invest In Africa – Specialized Advice From CWIIL Group

African equity exchange-traded funds (EFT) have soared over the past year, as the resource-rich continent is growing quickly, with low debt levels and a youthful and increasingly middle class demographic, but there are near-term risks to consider.

Global consultancy Ernst & Young believes Africa is the second-most-attractive investment destination, behind the U.S. According to Arthur Childs from advisory firm Arch Financial Planning, a number of asset managers believe Africa should be part of a mainstream equity portfolio for long-term investors. In a note to clients, he gathers five points from asset managers Alquity and Neptune Investment Management to state why investors should take note of this continent.

1. Africa has an Exciting Resource Story

Africa has rich resources in oil, natural gas, minerals, food and arable land. It has a land mass equivalent to Europe, the U.S, India, China and Argentina combined. Non-oil output is also expanding thanks to reforms in the energy sector.

2. Expanding Economy

The International Monetary Fund predicts that seven out of 10 of the world’s fastest-growing economies between 2011 and 2015 will be in Africa. Many sub-Saharan countries’ growth is predicted to rise from 5 to 5.5 percent per year as they emerge from the financial crisis.

3. Low Debt Levels

Africa has better debt to GDP levels than some developed countries. Alquity said that while the U.K.’s debt level is 77 percent, Nigeria’s is just 16 percent.

4. Growing Workforce

Africa is enjoying a growing middle class and a youthful workforce, already equivalent to that of India. A growing consumer base will also be a positive for the economy.

5. Low Correlation to Other Markets

Africa is relatively uncorrelated to developed and emerging equity markets, with a correlation of 0.27. According to Alquity, stocks are more driven by domestic factors. However, if China has a slower landing than expected, there will be weaker demand from African exporters and a knock-on effect on commodity prices.

Looming Risks

However, there are near-term risks in Africa to consider, including the rolling out of tighter monetary policy. An inflation target and more exchange rate flexibility is needed. There is also a vulnerable greater fiscal debt situation, especially in the countries that rely on foreign capital inflows.

Arthur Childs warned that only clients with a higher risk appetite and a long-term horizon should consider investing a maximum of 3 to 6 percent of their portfolio in Africa.

“It will hopefully be clear from what has been said that investors with a very cautious attitude to risk or whose capacity for loss is small should not consider investing any of their money in an Africa fund, or indeed in an emerging market fund,” Childs wrote.

These materials are not intended and should not be used as legal / investment advice or other recommendation. If you need a legal / investment opinion on a specific issue or factual situation, please contact a lawyer / investment advisor. Anyone using these materials should not rely on them as a substitute for legal / investment advice.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

African States Sign Cyber Security Deal – Legal Consultancy From CWIIL Group of Companies

Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan are among several African states to have signed a new deal on cyber security to protect multi-million-dollar oil and transport projects.

Presidents Yoweri Museveni of Uganda, Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya signed a memorandum of understanding on cyber security at the 10th Northern Corridor Integration Summit in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, on Saturday.

South Sudanese leader Salva Kiir and Pierre Nkurunziza of Burundi were represented by ministers.

The Northern Corridor summit has seen Uganda, Kenya, South Sudan and Rwanda review visa and ID card arrangements plus focus on the construction of a standard gauge railway and an oil pipeline.

Uganda made commercial oil discoveries in 2006 in the Albertine Region in the country’s south west with projected production to start in 2017 or 2018. Kenya has an estimated 10-billion-barrel reserve; South Sudan has just under half this.

The countries’ railway project is expected to ease the transportation of oil from Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan – which are also eyeing oil pipelines.

Uganda has signed an agreement worth $3.32 billion for engineering, procurement and construction contract with China Harbor and Engineering Company for the Northern and Eastern route of the standard gauge railway. Kenya has already progressed with the construction of the Mombasa-Nairobi section of the railway.

Ambassador James Mugume from Uganda said: “This cyber security agreement is going to be very important for this region. “If you invest money into a railway and oil pipeline and you don’t invest in security to protect it then you are wasting money, because terrorists will come and sabotage it. This is why within the Northern Corridor there is a supportive defensive system.”

The heads of states also signed agreements on total liberalization of labor and services and a memorandum of understanding on foreign policy coordination.

“As we integrate and look at various issues and projects, terrorists groups and other criminal elements are also taking advantage of the now-strong use of the internet platforms for communication and moving money,” Mugume added.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

Cyber Security – Missing Link In Africa’s Online Connectivity Boom – IT Security Advice & Solutions From CWIIL Group

Although the enabling potential of the internet for Africa is a popular story told alongside impressive statistics on internet access growth, cyber security needs more attention to keep pace with the rate of digital penetration.

High profile cases of cyber crime such as the recent hack on Sony Pictures are increasing public awareness of the risks associated with digitisation and the internet.

In Africa, internet usage grew seven times faster than the global average between 2000 and 2012, clocking more than 3,600 percent growth to a total 167 million users. Yet the flipside of the rapid expansion of internet infrastructure is poor cyber security safeguards.

On 17 January 2012 an Indonesian student and amateur hacker known online as Direxer hacked and defaced 103 Kenyan government websites. His tools? Tutorials on the Indonesian language forum Code Security. He attacked everything from the ministries of finance and education to police and prisons, leaving a song to play in the background when each site opened. Reportedly no information was stolen – but likely only because on this occasion theft was not the objective.

In a 2012 report, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) advises developing countries to “integrate protection measures into the roll-out of the internet from the beginning” because integrating these measures later on would be more cost-intensive.

“Although this might initially raise the cost of internet services, the long-term gains in avoiding the costs and damage inflicted by cybercrime are large and far outweigh any initial outlays on technical protection measures and network safeguards,” the report’s authors argue.

As a late adopter of internet infrastructure, African countries can capitalise on hindsight without having yet invested too many resources in developing it. Secure internet connections can be a competitive advantage in a future dominated by the online world, just as insecure internet can be a disadvantage.

Cyber criminals often look for a ‘mass market’ to hack, requiring many online targets and a preference for more affluent ones such as banks or large corporations. While some markets in Africa do not yet meet these criteria, this is no defence for the likes of South Africa, the third most attacked country after Russia and China.

At CyberCon 2014, David Isiavwe, chairperson of the Information Security Society of Nigeria, explained the ease of hacks in Africa makes the return on investment worthwhile.

“Most attacks launched towards Africa are actually coming from the US, because we are struggling here to keep things secure. The attackers target the markets that have the lowest work factor involved, and Africa is easier to breach,” he explains.

‘Computing hygiene’ is a set of practices that can help reduce the risk of digital attacks, according to David Finn, executive director, Microsoft Cybercrime Centre. These include using the official, most recent versions of software, anti-virus programmes and avoiding questionable sites. “We know unlicensed versions of software have a higher risk of being infected,” says Mr Finn.

However adoption of these measures remain low in many African countries. According to a Business Software Alliance report, on average 59 percent of software in Africa is unlicensed. Higher rates are found in Egypt (62 percent), Tunisia (75 percent), Kenya (78 percent), and Nigeria (81 percent).

One quarter of African computer users are still using Windows XP, first released in 2001. It is Africa’s second most popular operating system after the more recent Windows 7 at 52.85 percent, released in 2011.

“That is more than 10 year old technology at this point. That puts African computer users more at risk,” says Mr Finn. “The older versions of software do not benefit from the technological innovations and the security advances that the technology companies are able to leverage.”

The onus does not lie solely with consumers, however. Very little can be accomplished on a system-wide basis without the collaboration of a wide variety of organisations at the national, regional and global levels. CEOs, mindful of their share prices and quarterly targets, have reason to not want to disclose they have been attacked. However, this hinders coordinated counter-measures.

More fundamentally, cybercrime is not actually considered a crime in every country. Where the legal framework is in place, the definition of cybercrime often differs from one country to another.

“Africa as a whole is a good breeding ground for cyber criminals,” says Jason Gottschalk, associate director of KPMG South Africa. “Lack of legislation, lack of counter-attack capabilities, lack of the forensic skills, the ability to understand how these attacks are taking hold, makes it a good place for criminals to operate.”

Attempts have been made to address this, but efforts to draft an African Union convention on legal frameworks for cyber security has stalled since 2012.

The ITU’s Secretary-General, Dr Hamadoun Toure, recognises the challenges yet remains optimistic. He has found that the ITU’s Global Cybersecurity Index is useful for motivating government partners to take action. The index ranks countries across their legal and regulatory frameworks, technical readiness, national coordination, capacity building and international cooperation on cyber security. According to the ranking, Mauritius, Cameroon and Rwanda lead the continent in this regard.

“The countries in Africa that have succeeded, like Mauritius, have put in the right regulatory framework. Since 2001 they have been working on those things,” says Dr Toure.

The economic and social opportunity to optimise cyber security for Africa’s future has not passed yet, but it will take rapid action and concerted effort. However, this message is easily lost among the many urgent issues that compete for attention and resources.

“The first point is you have to realise that there is a problem…and I’m not quite sure the African continent is there yet,” says Mr Gottschalk.

As African countries try to navigate challenging social, economic and political transformations, cyber security does not yet appear to be a priority. However, as connectivity spreads, so will awareness of the security issues that accompany the many opportunities access affords – hopefully spurring the necessary attention and reforms needed to keep Africa’s internet users safe.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of cyber security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to cyber security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

Security Concerns Before Investing In Africa? – Specialized Advice From CWIIL Group

Africa’s dynamic security environment is characterized by great diversity – from conventional challenges such as insurgencies, resource and identity conflicts, and post-conflict stabilization to growing threats from piracy, narcotics trafficking, violent extremism, and organized crime taking root in Africa’s urban slums, among others.

Africa’s political environment has traditionally been a volatile one, characterised by instability, conflict, weak democratic institutions and military coups.  Socio–economic disparities and political tensions, overlaid with an abundance of natural resources, have ensured that the many of the continent’s states struggle with issues of conflict and instability. These conflicts are often hinged on several factors including poverty, human rights violations, bad governance and corruption, ethnic marginalization and small arms proliferation.

The continent has now come sharply into the spotlight for investors amidst growing questions around rising political and security risks. Amongst the key themes investors are grappling with are the mounting threats of religious extremism, the prospects of destabilising election-related violence, the growing issue of piracy as well as the potential spill-over of ethnic, religious tensions into widespread unrest. Consequently, the impact of these fundamental factors on the economic stability of countries has become critically important.

In an effort to help readers stay on top of this extensive array of security issues, ACSS  [ Africa Center for Strategic Studies ] has compiled and regularly updates a selective list of “must read” analyses of priority Africa security topics. The views expressed are those of the authors and do not represent an endorsement by ACSS or the the US Department of Defense.

Please click on a link below to learn more:

If you are in doubt whether to invest in an African region / country due to security worries always seek out information of the political, social, military, and economic aspects of security in that particular region / country from various sources to be able to make a fully knowledgeable and informative decision before proceeding with your investment regardless of it being as a private investor, corporate, institutional or even national level.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advise and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Google+ I Tumblr I Pinterest

For Queries Specific to Africa :
Email: africa@cwiilgroup.comhq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web: www.cwiilgroup.comwww.cwiilgroup.eu

CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.